Category Archives: History

Why did the United Nation Back Israel?

Submitted by Ilanna Sharon Mandel

For every historical event, there are numerous interpretations as to why it occurred.   The UN Mandate to create the State of Israel involved a complexity of issues and complications whose ramifications continue to resonate in the world today.  The reasons for the creation of the Mandate and the resulting fate of the Palestinian people began long before the actual Mandate itself.  To analyze why the UN created Israel, we have to consider several contributing factors:  the force and desires of the Zionist movement,  the Balfour Declaration,  the relationship between Britain, the United States and various Arab countries, British and American interests in Palestine and the impact of the Holocaust.

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Why did the United Nation Back Israel?

Submitted by Ilanna Sharon Mandel

For every historical event, there are numerous interpretations as to why it occurred.   The UN Mandate to create the State of Israel involved a complexity of issues and complications whose ramifications continue to resonate in the world today.  The reasons for the creation of the Mandate and the resulting fate of the Palestinian people began long before the actual Mandate itself.  To analyze why the UN created Israel, we have to consider several contributing factors:  the force and desires of the Zionist movement,  the Balfour Declaration,  the relationship between Britain, the United States and various Arab countries, British and American interests in Palestine and the impact of the Holocaust.

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Plato versus Aristotle: Theory of Forms and Causes

Plato was a philosopher who had been a student of Socrates. He formed the first known “university” called the Academy. Plato’s most widely known work is The Republic and his most famous idea is the Theory of Forms1-3.  Plato in his Theory of Forms believed that while one’s present life (experience) was varying, realistic and definite, the ideal forms were static and real. The Forms were universal and constituted the real world. What we see are particulars (mimics of the real thing). Plato believed there was an enormous divide in our perception of reality a. To Plato, reality was the exact opposite of what we perceive our earth to be. In essence, Plato’s theory emphasized a Form of recognition rather than cognition.  One has to be aware that from Plato’s viewpoint, all Forms were hidden from view and that the Ultimate form was the Form of Good 4.

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Machiavelli and Augustus Ruling Philosophy

Following up to the post about Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus, here is another post about Roman history.  This time from Elizabeth Rathgeber, who also wrote the post What to do about Sudan?.

I believe that Augustus and Niccoló Machiavelli would certainly agree much more so than disagree on how to be an effective ruler. The young Augustus seems to be an excellent example of a ruler whose actions agree with Machiavelli’s guidelines enunciated in The Prince. Machiavelli’s education included studying the “classics”, so it is not hard to make the connection that he was probably influenced by reading Suetonius’ account of the life of Imperator Caesar Augustus. Continue reading

The Roman Ideal: Tiberius Gracchus

Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus was a Roman politician who became plebeian tribune during the 2nd century BC.  Gracchus caused quite a bit of turmoil during his time.  Born in 168 BC, Gracchus died in 133 BC at the hands of the more conservative Roman Senate.  Below is a first person narrative written by Naaman Abreu.  Naaman has given me permission to publish this on my blog for all you Roman history lovers to enjoy. 

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